In All Things Podcast
RECOVERING – Feature Conversation: Felicia Wu Song

RECOVERING – Feature Conversation: Felicia Wu Song

January 11, 2022

On this episode of the podcast, I am joined by guest co-host Kayt Frisch, and together we talk with sociologist Dr. Felicia Wu Song about her new book, Restless Devices: Recovering Personhood, Presence, and Place in a Digital Age. Among the topics we discuss:

– How our devices (phones and computers) are more than mere tools, and what it means to evaluate them as cultural artifacts, the results of complex processes, driven by diverse influences

– What Christian designers and programmers can do to as they work in digital spaces

– How we should think about counter-cultural movements like "digital minimalism" and how the Christian story offers something distinct

– Why it is so difficult for us to change our digital habits and whether there are better ways to approach our counter-formation

– One thing to know, and one thing to do if we want to change

To read Dr. Kayt Frisch's review of Dr. Song's book: https://inallthings.org/corrupted-comforts-a-review-of-restless-devices/ 

REUNITING – Feature Conversation: Jennifer Powell McNutt

REUNITING – Feature Conversation: Jennifer Powell McNutt

November 30, 2021

On this episode of the podcast, we talk with theologian and historian Rev. Dr. Jennifer Powell McNutt about the relationship between science and theology. Together we discuss:

– How the narrative of a conflict between faith and science developed, and how this story of obscures important historical realities, especially during the Reformation

– The relationship between science and theology as well as between God’s two books: the book of creation and the book of Scripture.

– How we think about scientific investigation given the tension between suspicion (because of human sin) and confidence (because of the divine image and the reliability of human faculties)

– “Epistemic trespassing” and how pastors can live with the burden of being expected to weigh in on scientific issues, and how they build bridges between science and theology.

Books mentioned in this podcast:

History of the Conflict Between Religion and Science by John William Draper (1874)

A History of the Warfare of Science with Theology by Andrew Dickson White (1896)

Science and Theology in the Reformation by Charlotte Methuen (2008)

Since the Beginning: Interpreting Genesis 1 and 2 through the Ages ed. Kyle Greenwood (2018)

Follow Jennifer Powell McNutt on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jpowellmcnutt

Here is a link to Dr. McNutt’s First Mondays talk at Dordt University: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B-NTB-m2BQM  

PLANTING – Feature Conversation: Andrew Peterson

PLANTING – Feature Conversation: Andrew Peterson

November 16, 2021

On this episode of the podcast, we talk with singer-songwriter, author-beekeeper Andrew Peterson, about his new book The God of the Garden: Thoughts on Creation, Culture, and the Kingdom. Together we discuss:

– How the Covid-lockdown forced AP to put down roots after being on the road for the last 25 years, and the sort of creativity that being rooted in a physical place can produce.

– Why trees have so captivated AP's imagination and anchored his memory.

– How working with our hands connects to working with words, music, and art.

– On planting seeds of hope amidst seasons of sadness, and what it means to remain open and vulnerable instead of hardening our hearts

– On telling stories that are deeply (not necessarily overtly) Christian, and how AP navigates the tension between Fall and Redemption. 

– On practices that nourish ordinary creativity among artists and non-artists alike.

The podcast includes a short reading of  the opening pages of the book (12:36). 

Order The God of the Garden from The Rabbit Room: https://store.rabbitroom.com/products/the-god-of-the-garden 

Follow Andrew Peterson: https://www.andrew-peterson.com/ 

Bible Project Podcast on Trees (mentioned at 11:50): https://bibleproject.com/podcast/humans-are-trees/ 

Here is a link to Ruth Clark's IAT review of The God of the Garden: https://inallthings.org/for-the-beauty-of-the-earth-a-review-of-the-god-of-the-garden/ 

***Production note: this is the first episode we were able to record in person. Special thanks to tech genius Alex Priore for making it happen.***

 

STAYING – Feature Conversation: Dan Stringer

STAYING – Feature Conversation: Dan Stringer

November 2, 2021

On this episode of the podcast, we talk with Dan Stringer, a pastor and team leader for InterVarsity in Hawai'i. He is also the author of a new book, Struggling with Evangelicalism: Why I Want to Leave and What It Takes to Stay. Together we discuss:

  • How Dan's background as a "third culture kid" who lived in five countries on three continents + being a part of 9 (!) different denominations gave him unique lenses to see evangelicalism's strengths and weaknesses. 
  • How to define "evangelicalism," and the difference it makes when approaching evangelicalism as "brand" vs. a "space" 
  • Four stages of struggling with evangelicalism: awareness, appreciation, repentance, and renewal
  • What it means to make evangelical spaces "better than we found them."

Order from IVP: https://ivpress.com/struggling-with-evangelicalism 

Follow Dan on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RevDanStringer (@RevDanStringer) 

TRANSLATING – Feature Conversation: Terry Wildman

TRANSLATING – Feature Conversation: Terry Wildman

October 19, 2021

On this episode of the podcast, we talk with Terry Wildman, founder of Rain ministries and head of the translation team for the First Nations Version, an indigenous translation of the New Testament that involved a council of 12 and over 50 representatives from the native peoples of North America.

See the website here: https://firstnationsversion.com/

Order from IVP: https://www.ivpress.com/first-nations-version 

My co-host for this episode is Dr. Gayle Doornbos, professor of theology at Dordt. Together we discuss:

  • The story behind this indigenous translation of the New Testament and the many contributing scholars
  • The history of colonialism and how the translation team handled English words with negative connotations for native peoples (e.g., sin, kingdom)
  • The unique practice of translating names by what they mean, so that Jerusalem is rendered "Village of Peace" and Paul is "Small Man". 
  • What it might mean for the larger body of Christ to receive this new translation as a gift from the native peoples of North America.

Terry also reads a beautiful passage of Scripture for us (from Hebrews 1).

Here is my written reflection on the translation (which I use in part to introduce the episode): https://inallthings.org/gained-in-translation-a-review-of-the-first-nations-version/

SHOUTIN – Feature Conversation: Danté Stewart

SHOUTIN – Feature Conversation: Danté Stewart

October 5, 2021

On this episode of the podcast, we talk with Danté Stewart about his new book, Shoutin' in the Fire, a memoir about being Black and Christian in America. My guest co-host is Dr. Howard Schaap, professor of English at Dordt. Together we discuss: 

  • What it means to "shout in the fire," holding onto an honest, vulnerable, and resilient faith amidst pain, anger, and despair.
  • How his sense of the gospel of Jesus has been clarified and complicated over the course of his journey.
  • The importance of "keeping our eyes on the body" as we live in this world.
  • Literary and theological sources for the Black prophetic imagination, and how Danté found his writing voice.

Here is a link to Howard Schaap's review at our online journal: https://inallthings.org/the-prophetic-and-black-and-pentecostal-voice-a-review-of-shoutin-in-the-fire/ 

As mentioned in the intro, Danté mentions no less than 30 authors, and we have pulled together a list below:

Books mentioned by Danté:

Jesmyn Ward, Men We Reaped

Kiese Laymon, Heavy

Imani Perry, Breathe: A Letter to My Sons

Sarah Broom, The Yellow House

Darnell L. Moore, No Ashes in the Fire

Viet Thanh Nguyen, Nothing Ever Dies

Shawn Copeland, Enfleshing Freedom

Austin Channing Brown, I’m Still Here

Saidiya Hartman, Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments

Steven King, On Writing

N.K. Jemisin, The City We Became (fiction)

Robert Jones, Jr., The Prophets (fiction)

Octavia Butler, The Parable of the Sower (fiction)

 

Articles mentioned by Danté:

Elizabeth Alexander, “The Travon Generation”

Imani Perry, “Racism Is Terrible. Blackness Is Not.”

 

Authors mentioned by Danté:

James Baldwin

Toni Morrison

Deesha Philyaw

Maurice Ruffin

Jason Reynolds

Nikki Giovanni

James Cone

Kevin Quashie

Ta-Nehisi Coates

Willie James Jennings

Ashon Crawley

Gwendolyn Brooks

Zora Neale Hurston

Elizabeth Alexander

June Jordan

Amiri Baraka

Terrion Williamson

WONDERING – Feature Conversation: Elizabeth Hall

WONDERING – Feature Conversation: Elizabeth Hall

September 21, 2021

On this episode of the podcast, we talk with psychologist and researcher Elizabeth Hall about the psychology of doubt. This episode is in response to Dr. Hall's article, "Teaching Students to Doubt Well: The Roles of Intellectual Humility and Uncertainty Tolerance" (published in spring 2021 issue of Christian Scholar's Review). My co-host for this episode is Dr. Channon Visscher, professor of chemistry and planetary science at Dordt. Some topics we discuss:

  • What do we gain from paying attention to the psychological dimensions of doubt?
  • How can we think of faith and doubt in a way that takes rational, intuitive, and relational knowing into account?
  • What is "intellectual humility" and "uncertainty tolerance," and how do we develop these traits?
  • What are some strategies and practices for helping people "doubt well"?

To read the article: https://christianscholars.com/teaching-students-to-doubt-well-the-roles-of-intellectual-humility-and-uncertainty-tolerance/

WORLDVIEWING - Richard Mouw & Matthew Kaemingk

WORLDVIEWING - Richard Mouw & Matthew Kaemingk

September 7, 2021

On this episode of the podcast, we talk with theologians Richard Mouw and Matthew Kaemingk about a new book, edited by Matt and dedicated to Rich - Reformed Public Theology: A Global Vision for Life in the World (Baker Academic, 2021). The theme question of the episode: "why does theology matter for public life?" Some topics we discuss:

  • What do you mean by "Reformed"? What is "public" theology? And what is the unique contribution of the Reformed tradition to public theology?
  • In a book with 20+ authors of different nationalities, vocations, and denominations, what are the common threads these authors share?
  • As we seek to live in a pluralistic world, how do we learn to listen genuinely and to speak gently, with firm conviction?
  • What are some characteristic flaws or blind spots of the Reformed tradition that this book celebrates?
  • What does Reformed public theology have to say when it comes to institutional power, institutional sin, and institutional reform?
  • What does "every square inch" really mean? Why doesn't it mean Christians "taking over"?

If you'd like to read more, In All Things is hosting a four-part review of the book, which will be posted here as they become available:

Part One: https://inallthings.org/an-unlikely-story-a-review-of-reformed-public-theology/

Part Two: https://inallthings.org/neo-calvinism-for-the-nations-reviewing-part-2-3-of-reformed-public-theology/ 

Part Three: https://inallthings.org/the-academy-and-aesthetics-a-review-of-reformed-public-theology/ 

WINNING - Feature Conversation: Kristin Kobes Du Mez

WINNING - Feature Conversation: Kristin Kobes Du Mez

August 24, 2021

On this episode of the podcast, we talk with historian Kristin Kobes Du Mez about her NYT bestselling book Jesus and John Wayne (Liveright, 2020). The theme question of the episode: "what have we lost in our desire to win?" Some topics we discuss:

  • What surprised Kristin in her research and in the book's reception
  • Who is an evangelical? Who gets to say what is mainstream to evangelicalism and what is on the fringe?
  • How "Reformed" communities who have traditionally been "evangelical adjacent" fit into the picture.
  • What to do when we realize how much popular culture shapes Christian identity, and what it takes to resist, repent, and repair.
  • Areas for further research (the need for ethnographic studies!) and where the conversation can go from here.

If you'd like to read more you can check out the In All Things review of Kristin's book (written by my guest co-host, Scott Culpepper): https://inallthings.org/what-has-jesus-to-do-with-john-wayne-a-review-of-jesus-and-john-wayne/ 

 

DYING - Feature Conversation: J.Todd Billings

DYING - Feature Conversation: J.Todd Billings

May 25, 2021

On this episode of the podcast, we talk with J. Todd Billings, a theologian and author, about his book The End of the Christian Life (Brazos, 2020). Our theme question: what does it mean to embrace our mortality? Among the topics we discuss:

  • On being immersed in the cancer community after a terminal cancer diagnosis
  • How Western culture works to obscure the reality of our mortality 
  • How we can live in the tension between our smallness and the grand calling to make/change culture
  • On what a "good funeral" looks like and what the Christian hope actually is 
  • How the Covid pandemic has brought our mortality (and denial) into sharper relief.

If you'd like to read more you can check out our review of the book (written by my guest co-host, Todd Zuidema) here: https://inallthings.org/memento-mori-a-review-of-the-end-of-the-christian-life/ 

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